Nigerian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology

Latest Articles: Vol. 16, Issue 1 [Online First]

Otology

Published : April, 2019

OTITIS MEDIA WITH EFFUSION AND HEARING LOSS IN CHILDREN WITH OROFACIAL CLEFTS.

Olije T, Fasunla AJ, Onakoya PA, 1Ademola SA, Adeosun AA. I

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University College Hospital, Ibadan Abuja

CORRESPONDENCE: Dr AJ Fasunla: Email:ayofasunla@yahoo.com


Abstract:

Summary

Background: Little or no attention is given to hearing health of children with orofacial cleft.This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of otitis media with effusion (OME) and evaluate hearing thresholds of children with orofacial cleft in Nigeria.

Methodology: Eighty-three consecutive children with orofacial cleft comprising, 12 (14.5%) cleft lip alone, 32 (38.5%) cleft lip and palate and 39 (47.0%) cleft palate alone, and 83 healthy controls participated in the study. Structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and relevant medical information. Participants had ear, nose and throat examinations, visual reinforcement or condition play audiometry and tympanometry tests done. Statistical analysis was done with appropriate statistical tools, level of significance was set at p<0.05.

Results: Mean age of cases was 22.83 ± 2.71 months and controls was 23.34 ± 2.54 months. Hearing loss was found in 28 (16.9%) ears of cases and 14 (8.5%) ears of controls (p=0.021). There was a significant difference between mean hearing thresholds of cleft palate ± lip and control (p<0.05). OME was present in 80 (48.2%) ears of cases and 17 (10.2%) ears of the controls (p=0.001). There was a statistically significant association between cleft palate ± lip and OME (p=0.0001, OR = 4.520 [2.353-8.681]).

Conclusion: Otitis media with effusion and hearing loss were more prevalent among children with orofacial cleft palate than non-cleft children. Hence, routine early hearing and middle ear evaluations are recommended for inclusion in their management plan. Keywords: Children; Conductive hearing loss; Orofacial clefts; Otitis media with effusion


Head & Neck

Published : April, 2019

CLINICO-RADIOLOGICAL FEATURES AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT OF A PAROTID HAEMANGIOMA IN AN INFANT

*OkolugboNekwu Emmanuel, **Ikubor Joyce Ekeme.

Department of Surgery, DELSUTH, Oghara

CORRESPONDENCE: Dr NE Okolugbo: Email:nekouokolugbo@yahoo.com, Tel: +2348038011767.


Abstract:

Parotid haemangiomas are best diagnosed from clinical presentation, however imaging plays a critical role in confirming the diagnosis. We present a classic case of Parotid Haemangioma with its radiological features which was subsequently managed medically with oral propanolol with good clinical response and successful outcome, nil side effects of management was noted.

Keywords: Parotid haemangioma, radiological imaging, clinical presentation, Propanolol.


General ENT

Published : April, 2019

AUDIT OF OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGICAL PRACTICE IN SOME PRIVATE FACILITIES SOUTH-SOUTH, NIGERIA

Akpalaba IO*, Ogisi FO**

Hope Hospital, 42 Costain Road, Benin City, Edo State* Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, (UBTH), Benin.

CORRESPONDENCE: Dr Akpalaba IO, Hope Hospital, 42, Costain Road, Benin City, Edo State: Email:drogeakpalaba@gmail.com


Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: Most audits on otorhinolaryngology have been in tertiary and government establishments. The private facilities however form the first point of contact with most patients both in urban and rural areas hence the need for this audit in private facilities. AIM: To determine the pattern of otorhinolaryngological disorders in private practice, to highlight the challenges encountered in these facilities and proffer possible solutions.

METHOD: This was a one year prospective study carried out after obtaining ethical clearance and permission from relevant authorities. Four hospitals picked at random served as study centers. They were Juno Medical Centre, Hope Hospital, Echoes Hospital andSt.Raphael'sHospital,allindifferentlocationsin Benin City. These private hospitals are accessed by the general public of all socioeconomic status. Total population sampling technique was used. All consecutive otorhinolaryngological patients who consented to the study from 3rd May, 2016 to 2nd April, 2017 constituted the sample size. The study commenced after obtaining duly written informed consent. History taking, general and Ear, Nose and Throat examinations were done. Participants were evaluated and managed accordingly. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS Version 20. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

RESULT: A total of 100 subjects were studies. Age ranged from 1 to 90 years. Mean age was 33.02 ± 24.24 years. M:F = 1 : 1.1 (p = 0.333). Ear disorders predominated and the commonest ear condition was Cerumen Auris in 19.8% subjects followed by Chronic suppurative otitis media in 18.7% subjects. (p> 0.05). Major challenges encountered were insufficient funds to settle medical bills in 43.4% subjects, missed surgeries in 10.3% subjects, ignorance / delayed presentation in 9.1% subjects and insufficient equipment in 6.9% subjects.

CONCLUSION: Cerumen Auris was the commonest otorhinolaryngological disorder in the private facilities. Challenges abound in private facilities. The recommended solutions are government private sponsorship and exposure of the doctors, especially young graduates, to entrepreneurship.

KEY WORDS: Audit, Otorhinolaryngology, Private facilities, Challenges

Broncho-Oesophagology

Published : April, 2019

BRONCHIAL FOREIGN BODY: A CASE REPORT

Sa'ad Olanrewaju Idris FWACS; Joseph Yohanna FWACS; Olayinka Abdulmajid Suleiman FWACS; AbuYaro Mustapha FWACS; Aliyu Nasir FWACS; Oluwole Emmanuel Gbadeyan MBBS.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, FMC Katsina, Katsina State

CORRESPONDENCE: Dr Idris Sa'ad Olanrewaju Department of ENT,UITH, P.M.B. 1459, Ilorin, Kwara State. lanreidris2005@yahoo.com, +2348030758489.


Abstract:

No Abstract


Pharyngology

Published : April, 2019

SYMPTOM GUIDED FOREIGN BODY RETRIEVAL FROM THE OROPHARYNX USING HOPKINS ROD TELESCOPE: A NOVEL MANOEUVRE

1Omokanye HK, 1Omotoso W, 1Ajayi IO, 2Olaniyan OD

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, 1College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin. Nigeria. 2Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso. Nigeria.

CORRESPONDENCE: Dr Omokanye Habeeb Kayodele Department of Otorhinolaryngology, College of Health Sciences. University of Ilorin/ University of Ilorin Teaching hospital. P. M. B. 1515, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria. habeebomokanye@yahoo.com, Zip code: 240001. Tel: +2348035012930.


Abstract:

No Abstract



Rhinology

Published : April, 2019

NASOALVEOLAR CYST: A CASE SERIES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

*Okhakhu A.L, **Okolugbo N.E

*Ear, Nose and Throat Department , University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City. ** Department of Surgery, Delta State University Abraka , Delta State.

CORRESPONDENCE:


Abstract:

Background: Nasoalveolar cysts are relatively rare extra osseous soft tissue lesions located on the nasal alar region of the face. They are slow growing and usually result in facial deformity of the facial appearance. Their location between the floor of the nose and the alveolar process helps in their diagnosis. This paper presents our experience with these cysts in a tertiary health facility in the Southern part of Nigeria. Methodology: A descriptive retrospective review of the case records of the patients diagnosed with nasoalveolar cyst at the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital over a period of 5 years. Results: A total of 4 females had nasolabial cysts with surgical excision of the lesions. Conclusion: Nasolabial cysts are rare non odontogenic cysts which are amenable to surgical excision. Key words: nasoalveolar, nasolabial, cyst, excision.


Laryngology

Published : April, 2019

SUICIDAL CUT THROAT INJURY: A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Dr Ogah SA, Dr Oladejo SO, Dr Egbeola AA, Dr Ajogbon D

*Ear, Nose and Throat Department , University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City. ** Department of Surgery, Delta State University Abraka , Delta State.

CORRESPONDENCE: Dr Stephen Agbomhekhe Ogah MB.BS, FMCORL. Federal Medical Centre, Lokoja. Email:-stephenogah@yahoo.com Tel:-08075224222


Abstract:

Cut throat injuries can be homicidal, suicidal and very rarely accidentalin occurrence. A good history and clinical examination by the attending Physician are usually enough to make a diagnosis in most cases. In the suicidal type, a history of psychiatric illness that is either undiagnosed or diagnosed but not committed to proper treatment can be obtained from patient's relations or close friends. The initial management of the patient depends on the patient's condition on arrival to the Hospital and the definitive management protocol is multidisciplinary in nature that should include the Otolaryngologist, Anaesthesiologist and Psychiatrist. Best outcome is achieved with early patient's referral (within 6hours) to the appropriate Health Care facility, good resuscitation and primary wound repair in layers. Patient's morbidity and mortality has been found to increase withsevere damage to vital structures in the neck,poor patient resuscitation, delayed referral of greater than 24 hoursand when the wound has been poorly repaired previously. The knowledge of the neck vital structures and the extent of their damage in the anatomical neck zone involve is important in planning the surgical wound repair of cut throat injuries. Key word: Suicidal, cut throat, prognosis, schizophrenia and depression.